Contact dermatitis is a skin condition that occurs when the skin comes into contact with an irritant or allergen. It is characterized by redness, itching, and sometimes blistering. Here are some key terms related to contact dermatitis:

  • Contact dermatitis: A skin condition that occurs when the skin comes into contact with an irritant or allergen.
  • Irritant contact dermatitis: A type of contact dermatitis that occurs when the skin comes into contact with a substance that directly damages the outer layer of skin.
  • Allergic contact dermatitis: A type of contact dermatitis that occurs when the skin comes into contact with a substance that triggers an immune response in the body.
  • Allergen: A substance that triggers an immune response in the body.
  • Irritant: A substance that directly damages the outer layer of skin.
  • Patch testing: A test that is performed to assess for allergic contact dermatitis. It involves placing a panel of allergens on aluminium discs that are taped onto the back for a week.
  • Hydrocortisone cream: A cream or ointment that can be applied to the itchy area to reduce inflammation.
  • Emollients: Moisturizers that can be used to stop the skin from becoming dry.
  • Topical corticosteroid: A cream or ointment that can be applied directly to the skin to reduce inflammation.
  • Photosensitivity: A condition in which some products cause a reaction only when the skin is also exposed to sunlight.
  • Poison ivy: A plant that can cause contact dermatitis.
  • Nickel: A metal that is often used in costume jewellery and is the most common allergen.
  • Preservatives: Chemicals that are added to products to prevent spoilage and can cause contact dermatitis.
  • Fragrances: Chemicals that are added to products to give them a pleasant scent and can cause contact dermatitis.

If you experience symptoms of contact dermatitis, it is important to identify and avoid the substance that is causing the reaction. You can also use emollients, hydrocortisone cream, or topical corticosteroids to relieve the symptoms. If your symptoms are severe or do not improve, you should see a doctor or dermatologist for further treatment.

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